Supreme Court Rules against EPA, Hobbles Government Power to Limit Emissions

Court sides with Republican states as ruling represents landmark moment in rightwing effort to dismantle ‘regulatory state.’

The US Supreme Court has sided with Republican-led states to in effect hobble the federal government’s ability to tackle the climate crisis, in a ruling that will have profound implications for the government’s overall regulatory power.

A coal-fired power plant in Arizona. The Supreme Court has opted to support a case brought by West Virginia that limits the EPAs ability to regulate planet-heating gases and could have sweeping consequences for the federal government’s ability to regulate in other areas as well. Photo by Alan Stark.

In a 6-3 decision that will seriously hinder America’s ability to stave off disastrous global heating, the Supreme Court, which became dominated by rightwing justices under the Trump administration, has opted to support a case brought by West Virginia that demands the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) be limited in how it regulates planet-heating gases from the energy sector.

The case, which was backed by a host of other Republican-led states including Texas and Kentucky, was highly unusual in that it was based upon the Clean Power Plan, an Obama-era strategy to cut emissions from coal-fired power plants that never came into effect. The Biden administration sought to have the case dismissed as baseless given the plan was dropped and has not been resurrected.

Not only was this case about a regulation that does not exist, that never took effect, and which would have imposed obligations on the energy sector that it would have met regardless. It also involves two legal doctrines that are not mentioned in the constitution, and that most scholars agree have no basis in any federal statute.

However, the Supreme Court has sided with West Virginia, a major coal mining state, which argued that “unelected bureaucrats” at the EPA should not be allowed to reshape its economy by limiting pollution — even though emissions from coal are helping cause worsening flooding, heatwaves, and droughts around the world, as well as killing millions of people through toxic air.

“Capping carbon dioxide emissions at a level that will force a nationwide transition away from the use of coal to generate electricity may be a sensible ‘solution to the crisis of the day’,” wrote Chief Justice John Roberts in the opinion. “But it is not plausible that Congress gave EPA the authority to adopt on its own such a regulatory scheme in Section 111(d). A decision of such magnitude and consequence rests with Congress itself, or an agency acting pursuant to a clear delegation from that representative body.”

Roberts was joined by the conservative justices Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett. The three liberal justices, Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, and Stephen Breyer dissented. It is the most important climate change case to come before the Supreme Court in more than a decade.

But the ruling could also have sweeping consequences for the federal government’s ability to set standards and regulate in other areas, such as clean air and water, consumer protections, banking, workplace safety, and public health. It may prove a landmark moment in conservative ambitions to dismantle the “regulatory state,” stripping away protections from Americans across a wide range of areas.

It could fundamentally change what the federal government is and what it does. And, as justice Elena Kagan pointed out in her dissent, it could leave technical decisions to a political body that may not understand them.

“First, members of Congress often don’t know enough — and know they don’t know enough — to regulate sensibly on an issue. Of course, members can and do provide overall direction. But then they rely, as all of us rely in our daily lives, on people with greater expertise and experience. Those people are found in agencies,” she wrote.

Several conservatives on the court have criticized what they see as the unchecked power of federal agencies, concerns evident in orders throwing out two Biden policies aimed at reducing the spread of Covid-19.

Last summer, the six-to-three conservative majority ended a pandemic-related pause on evictions over unpaid rent. In January, the same six justices blocked a requirement that workers at large employers be vaccinated or test regularly for the coronavirus and wear a mask on the job.

The Biden administration was supported in the EPA court case by New York and more than a dozen other Democratic-led states, along with prominent businesses such as Apple, Amazon and Google that have called for a swift transition to renewable energy.

The administration has vowed to cut US emissions in half by the end of this decade but has floundered in its attempts to legislate this outcome, with a sweeping climate bill sunk by the opposition of Republican senators and Joe Manchin, the centrist Democratic senator from West Virginia.

The federal government also had the power of administrative regulations in order to force reductions in emissions but the Supreme Court ruling will now imperil this ability.

You Make Our Work Possible

You Make Our Work Possible

We don’t have a paywall because, as a nonprofit publication, our mission is to inform, educate and inspire action to protect our living world. Which is why we rely on readers like you for support. If you believe in the work we do, please consider making a tax-deductible year-end donation to our Green Journalism Fund.

Donate
Get the Journal in your inbox.
Sign up for our monthly newsletter.

The Latest

Amid Pledges to Reverse Deforestation, DRC Auctioning Oil Blocks in Protected Areas

At the same time, Indigenous tribes are being violently expelled from their land in the name of conservation, report says.

Rebecca George

Textile Company Misled Regulators about Use of Toxic PFAS, Documents Show

Thousands more New Hampshire residents may be drinking tainted water in a region plagued by health problems thought to stem from PFAS pollution.

Tom Perkins The Guardian

Past the Salt

In San Francisco's salty South Bay, an ambitious wetlands restoration project is attempting to balance a return to the ecological past with the realities of a changing future.

Skylar Knight Photographs by joSon

Fast Fashion’s Dumping Problem

The industry has long come under fire for tossing unsold clothing. Is it finally evolving?

Cameya Martin

Call for Hippos to Join List of World’s Most Endangered Animals

New classification would mean a total ban on international trade in the animal’s body parts, as climate crisis and poaching hit populations.

Patrick Greenfield The Guardian

Fishing Gear Are Killing North Atlantic Right Whales. A Slew of Federal Bills and Rules Seek to Protect Them.

Fewer than 350 of these critically endangered cetaceans remain and they are dying at faster rates than they can reproduce.

Charles Pekow