• In the Land of Bonobos
    Can a pioneering rehabilitation project create a harmonious co-existence between
    people and bonobos?
    By Christopher Clark
  • The Long Run Home
    The Winnemem Wintu tribe and their salmon relative are both on the verge of vanishing. Can a “desperate” plan save them?
    By Maureen Nandini Mitra
  • Deep Impact
    A high resolution map of the seafloor could be a boon for explorers and a curse
    for deep sea creatures.
    By Adrienne Bernhard

Latest News

Ryan Zinke to Look into Unpopular Montana Land Exchange Proposal

The 5,000-acre proposal by Texas oil barons was twice rejected under Obama

The US interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, has promised to look into a Montana land exchange proposal from Texas oil and gas billionaires Dan and Farris Wilks that was twice rejected under the Obama administration, the Guardian can reveal. Photo by Bob Wick/Bureau…
> Read more

You Can’t Frack Without Harming Public Health, New Research Shows

Study examines over 1,200 peer-reviewed research papers, government reports, news articles

The conclusion is damning. “All together, findings to date from scientific, medical, and journalistic investigations combine to demonstrate that fracking poses significant threats to air, water, health, public safety, climate stability, seismic stability, community cohesion, and long-term economic vitality.” Photo courtesy of…
> Read more

Mega Dams Are So Last Year

And we can’t wait for the day we can say these destructive projects are history

In February last year, the residents of the small town of Oroville in California’s Gold Country were told a 30-foot wall of water was headed their way. The men and women of the town ran through the streets in panic, and almost…
> Read more

An Endangered Fish Out of Water

A unique hatchery program is keeping the Rio Grande’s silvery minnow alive. But the long-term fate of this tiny fish is uncertain.

When irrigation was introduced to New Mexico, principally by the Spanish four centuries ago, the Rio Grande began its long decline from a wild, free-flowing river to a channeled ditch delivering water from its headwaters in the San Juan Mountains in southern…
> Read more

Wyoming Proposes Grizzly Bear Hunt for First Time in Four Decades

Move comes less than a year after the iconic bears were stripped of Endangered Species Act protections.

Yellowstone grizzly bears could be legally hunted for the first time in four decades under a proposalissued by Wyoming officials last week. Photo courtesy of Yellowstone National ParkA grizzly bear on Swan Lake Flats in the Wyoming section of Yellowstone National Park.…
> Read more

A Mega Giving Circle Makes Us Powerful

Making massive cooperation on issues that impact life on the planet regular, easy, and fun is a reasonable next step in movement building

When I have conversations about climate change with other people, the recurring theme is helplessness: They are acutely aware of the severity of the threat to life on the planet but struggle to find constructive outlets for their concern. Petitions, marches and…
> Read more

more articles


Gina Lopez
The Philippine’s former environment secretary talks about how love can be a force for change and her support of the country’s controversial president.
> Read more
Dineen O’Rourke
The 2017 Brower Youth Award winner writes about why we need to focus on climate justice.
> Read more

Current Issue

thumbnail of the cover of the Earth Island Journal


In the dry Patagonian desert, penguins are contending with an unexpected impact of climate change: rain.
By Eric Wagner

The Way of the Canoe

For many generations, canoes have allowed us to engage intimately with the environment.
By Mark Neužil

Where to Travel in 2018

By “voting with our wings” – choosing our destinations well and cultivating our roles as citizen diplomats – we can change the world for the better.
By Ethical Traveler