Tackling Energy Poverty in Sarawak

Communities in Malaysian Borneo are embracing micro-hydro as mega-dams leave them energy poor.

Fiona McAlpine

Big Green Groups Struggle to Retain Staff of Color

High turnover keeps people of color from moving up the career ladder, widens the movement’s already significant diversity gap.

Zoe Loftus-Farren

GE American Chestnut — Restoration of a Beloved Species or Trojan Horse for Tree Biotechnology?

Biotech industry hopes that getting genetically engineered chestnut approved for conservation planting will soften public opposition to transgenic trees.

Rachel Smolker Anne Petermann

With Dozens of Sick Children, Parents Took a Hard Look at Their Town’s Toxic Legacy

The carcinogen TCE has been lurking in the ground beneath Franklin, Indiana, for decades. Now families are demanding answers.

Susan Cosier

Students Accuse US Schools of Censoring Climate Crisis Message in Graduation Speeches

Highschoolers say authorities have barred them from reading text that warns of ‘catastrophic climate change’ for being too political.

Oliver Milman The Guardian

Florida’s Ongoing Struggle with Non-Native Water Hyacinth

The Sunshine State continues controversial spraying of herbicides like glyphosate to combat the aquatic weed.

Robert Beringer

Old-Growth Logging Leaves Black Bears without Dens, Biologists Say

British Columbia protects beaver lodges and occupied migratory bird nests, but there are no regulations protecting black bear dens in most parts of the province.

Sarah Cox

California’s Twin Tunnels Water Project Is Dead. What’s Next?

Environmental advocates are cautiously optimistic about plans to downscale the controversial WaterFix project.

Cindy Xin

Trump Administration Rebrands Natural Gas as ‘Freedom Gas’

Department of Energy calls fossil fuels 'US molecules of US Freedom' as administration redoubles assault on the climate.

Andy Rowell

‘The Biggest Challenge Was Not Being Heard’

A conversation with Washington activist who helped stop North America’s largest oil terminal project.

Maureen Nandini Mitra

As a GMO Stunt, Professor Tasted Pesticide and Gave it To Students

People who offer to taste pesticides are not doing science. They are promoting corporate products, in this case Bt Brinjal.

Jonathan Latham

Misreading the Story of Climate Change and the Maya

Instead of focusing on the final stages of Classic Maya civilization, society can learn from the practices that enabled it to survive for nearly 700 years.

Kenneth Seligson

The Biomass Delusion Comes to Mississippi

Lucedale citizens protest plans for largest wood pellet plant in the world.

Rita Frost

Learning from the Camp Fire Six Months On

California’s deadliest wildfire holds important lessons for communities across the West as we approach a new fire season.

George Wuerthner

AI-Backed Sensors Help Reduce Wind Turbine Risks to Protected Birds

New technology identifies target species, shuts down turbines to avoid deadly collisions

Angela Sivak

The Philippines Is Rallying Behind Its Disappearing Dwarf Buffalo

From Indigenous groups to international conservation organizations, everyone is getting in line to save the critically endangered tamaraw.

Jason Bittel