Latest News

Delay in Dungeness Crab Fishing Season Offers a Big Climate Lesson

Toxic algal bloom that’s poisoning sea life is linked to an incredibly persistent patch of warm water off the West Coast

The annual Dungeness crab season is already underway yet harbors all along the West Coast of North America are ghost towns during a time when they are expected to be chaotic with activity. “Normally on the season opener our parking lot looks…
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Peddling a New Model of Urban Farming

Bike-riding farmers in Orlando, Florida are helping communities produce their own food – right on their own front lawns.

The smile on Heather Grove's face competes with the bright shine of the sunflowers surrounding her. "Sunflowers are amazing – they actually remove toxins from the soil," she beams as she showcases a Fleet Farming garden. This "farmlette" was created on a…
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Are Americans Becoming Disenchanted with Black Friday?

Retailers encourage consumers to avoid the post-Thanksgiving shopping craze and get outside instead

Black Friday is traditionally one of the biggest shopping days of the year, but this year there seems to be some backlash. REI made waves last month when it announced that it would be closing all of its 143 retail locations, headquarters and two distribution…
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FDA’s Approval of GE Salmon Based on Bad Science, Say Consumer Advocates

Agency’s move sets a low bar for future approvals of genetically engineered animals for human consumption

More than 20 years after the first genetically engineered plant hit American grocery stores, the FDA has approved the first transgenic animal for human consumption: a salmon. The AquaBounty Salmon, as it is known, is an Atlantic salmon genetically engineered to grow…
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Turn Up the Heat Locally, Urge Climate Groups Following Cancellation of Marquee Paris March

Concurrent marches planned in cities across the world during COP21 have now taken on added significance

It’s final: The November 29 marquee climate march in Paris has been cancelled. A week ago (November 17) we reported climate change activists saying that they would press on with a major march in Paris on November 29 despite the French government’s…
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US Dolphin Safe Tuna Label is Unfair to Mexico, WTO rules yet again

Marine mammal advocates accuse trade body of putting business above dolphin protection

If Mexico and the World Trade Organization have their way, those “dolphin safe” cans of tuna you’ve been buying at the supermarket might actually come stained with dolphin blood. Last Friday, the global trade body again ruled against the United States in…
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Seeking Crop Elders

Scientists and crop breeders are racing to identify the wild ancestors of domesticated plants before a warming world hastens their demise

David Rupple presses two thumbs into the soft tissues of the sunflower’s broad, droopy face and parts a few of its several hundred mini florets. This flower is most likely an oil producer but he won’t know for sure until he sees…
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more articles


Victoria Tauli-Corpuz
A conversation with the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous People.
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Linda Hogan
The Chickasaw essayist, novelist and poet on the “radiant life with animals.”
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Oren Lyons
The Onondaga leader discusses the long fight for Indigenous sovereignty.
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Current Issue

thumbnail of the cover of the Earth Island Journal

The Heart of Everything That Is

Our ideas about wild nature can’t be understood without knowing the stories of the people who lived in North America before Columbus.
By Jason Mark

Renewing Relatives

One tribe’s efforts to bring back an ancient fish.
By Marty Holtgren, Stephanie Ogren, and Kyle Whyte

Indigenous Migrant Farmworkers Demand Change in the Fields

From Baja California to Washington State, farmworkers are pressing for higher wages and respect.
Photos and Text by David Bacon

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