• In the Land of Bonobos
    Can a pioneering rehabilitation project create a harmonious co-existence between
    people and bonobos?
    By Christopher Clark
  • The Long Run Home
    The Winnemem Wintu tribe and their salmon relative are both on the verge of vanishing. Can a “desperate” plan save them?
    By Maureen Nandini Mitra
  • Deep Impact
    A high resolution map of the seafloor could be a boon for explorers and a curse
    for deep sea creatures.
    By Adrienne Bernhard

Latest News

Who Owns Water? The US Landowners Putting Barbed Wire Across Rivers

New Mexico is a battleground in the fight over once public waterways

As Scott Carpenter and a few friends paddled down the Pecos river in New Mexico last May, taking advantage of spring run-off, the lead boater yelled out and made a swirling hand motion over his head in the universal signal to pull…
> Read more

Awe May Be a Forest’s Least Known Gift

The perception of the interconnections among things is what inspires this powerful emotion, say researchers

In 1836, in his essay Nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson described the powerful effect that being in woods had on him: “Standing on the bare ground, my head bathed by the blithe air and uplifted into infinite space, all mean egotism vanishes. I…
> Read more

Ryan Zinke to Look into Unpopular Montana Land Exchange Proposal

The 5,000-acre proposal by Texas oil barons was twice rejected under Obama

The US interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, has promised to look into a Montana land exchange proposal from Texas oil and gas billionaires Dan and Farris Wilks that was twice rejected under the Obama administration, the Guardian can reveal. Photo by Bob Wick/Bureau…
> Read more

You Can’t Frack Without Harming Public Health, New Research Shows

Study examines over 1,200 peer-reviewed research papers, government reports, news articles

The conclusion is damning. “All together, findings to date from scientific, medical, and journalistic investigations combine to demonstrate that fracking poses significant threats to air, water, health, public safety, climate stability, seismic stability, community cohesion, and long-term economic vitality.” Photo courtesy of…
> Read more

Mega Dams Are So Last Year

And we can’t wait for the day we can say these destructive projects are history

In February last year, the residents of the small town of Oroville in California’s Gold Country were told a 30-foot wall of water was headed their way. The men and women of the town ran through the streets in panic, and almost…
> Read more

An Endangered Fish Out of Water

A unique hatchery program is keeping the Rio Grande’s silvery minnow alive. But the long-term fate of this tiny fish is uncertain.

When irrigation was introduced to New Mexico, principally by the Spanish four centuries ago, the Rio Grande began its long decline from a wild, free-flowing river to a channeled ditch delivering water from its headwaters in the San Juan Mountains in southern…
> Read more

more articles


Gina Lopez
The Philippine’s former environment secretary talks about how love can be a force for change and her support of the country’s controversial president.
> Read more
Dineen O’Rourke
The 2017 Brower Youth Award winner writes about why we need to focus on climate justice.
> Read more

Current Issue

thumbnail of the cover of the Earth Island Journal


In the dry Patagonian desert, penguins are contending with an unexpected impact of climate change: rain.
By Eric Wagner

The Way of the Canoe

For many generations, canoes have allowed us to engage intimately with the environment.
By Mark Neužil

Where to Travel in 2018

By “voting with our wings” – choosing our destinations well and cultivating our roles as citizen diplomats – we can change the world for the better.
By Ethical Traveler