• photo of oxen and a man with a plow in the tropicsCuba Verde
    Will the long-isolated island’s low-carbon adaptations endure?
    By Bill Weinberg
  • photo of a gold nugget in the palm of a personArc of Desperation
    Venezuela’s decision to open up the Orinoco Belt to mining threatens the Amazon rainforest.
    By Bram Ebus
  • photo of oily mud and waterPachamama’s Blood
    Ecuador’s Sápara people are developing strategies to fend off the dual threats of oil development and climate change.
    By Gleb Raygorodetsky
  •  

Latest News

Governments Need to Take A Hard Stand Against Illegal Fishing Industry

Recent shark hunts by China-based company highlights need for independent monitoring by NGOs, says Sea Shepherd activist

In Timor Leste law, a small country in Southeast Asia that achieved its independence from Indonesia in 2002, shark hunting is illegal, but that didn't prevent a China- based company from sending vessels out to the country's waters recently to illegally catch…
> Read more

Planned Rail Line Would Intersect Kenya’s Nairobi National Park

Conservationists worried Chinese-backed project will threaten safety of wildlife, integrity of ecosystem

Nairobi National Park has become the focal point of a conflict between national development priorities and environmental conservation in Kenya. Established in 1946, this 117-square-kilometer wilderness area is the oldest state park in Kenya, and home to incredible biodiversity. Animals such as…
> Read more

In Conversation with Cascadia’s Shannon Wilson

Veteran forest defender discusses 30 years of ecosystem advocacy

Forests store and sequester mind-boggling quantities of carbon, making forest protection one of the most effective (and simplest) actions we can take to buffer our planet against the ravages of climate change — a fact that “ecosystem advocate” Shannon Wilson is well…
> Read more

Development Banks Continue to Sink Billions into Fossil Fuel Projects

Public financing for oil and gas estimated at $9 billion in 2016 fiscal year alone, much of it after Paris Agreement

In the last year alone, vulnerable populations have suffered massive damage from the impacts of a changing climate. “Super hurricanes” have torn through the Caribbean — turbocharged by abnormally warm waters — making islands uninhabitable. Flooding, mudslides, wildfires, and avalanches have hit…
> Read more

The Energy East Pipeline is Dead, but Three Tar Sands Pipeline Projects Remain

Anti-pipeline activists celebrate victory, caution against complacence

Last week, energy company TransCanada pulled the plug on its 2,800-mile Energy East Pipeline and Eastern Mainline projects, which would have shipped 1.1 million barrels of crude oil from the Athabasca tar sands to refineries in Eastern Canada. The move was celebrated…
> Read more

Conservationists Sound Alarm on Plummeting Giraffe Numbers

Pending US Endangered Species Act listing could support recovery efforts, say advocates

Picture an animal enrobed in a fiery, jigsaw-patterned coat. A creature of such majestic height that it towers amongst the trees. As your eyes make their way up its long neck that appears to defy gravity, you find crowned atop its head…
> Read more

more articles

Voices

Mustafa Ali
The former head of the EPA’s environmental justice office talks openly about why he left the position and how – despite the current political climate – he’s hopeful about the future.
> Read more
Ted Lieu
The California Congressman writes about the power of natural places and the need for robust climate action at the federal level.
> Read more

Current Issue

thumbnail of the cover of the Earth Island Journal

Heavy Metal

The debate about how to reduce use of lead ammunition is heating up in Oregon.
By James Yuskavitch

An Unraveling Web

Along the California coast, a race to save marine mammals from a life-threatening toxin.
By Jeremy Miller

De-Junking Paradise

A province of Vanuatu is turning to local, organic food in an effort to stave off diet-related illness.
By Anna Lappé

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