• In the Land of Bonobos
    Can a pioneering rehabilitation project create a harmonious co-existence between
    people and bonobos?
    By Christopher Clark
  • The Long Run Home
    The Winnemem Wintu tribe and their salmon relative are both on the verge of vanishing. Can a “desperate” plan save them?
    By Maureen Nandini Mitra
  • Deep Impact
    A high resolution map of the seafloor could be a boon for explorers and a curse
    for deep sea creatures.
    By Adrienne Bernhard
  •  

Latest News

Could Sprinkling Sand Save the Arctic’s Shrinking Sea Ice?

Pilot project at northern Alaska lake is one of many aiming to slow climate change with geoengineering, and raising concerns about unintended consequences

As a test location for a project that aims to ensure the livability of Earth, a frozen lake near the northern tip of Alaska could seem rather inauspicious. Photo by Andrew PetersenSea ice near Utqiaġvik, Alaska. Researchers will be sprinking tiny spheres…
> Read more

Putting Her Life on the Line to Save a River from Illegal Gold Mining

Goldman Prize winner Francia Márquez’s has been involved in a long struggle to protect the Ovejas River and her Afro-Colombian community

Francia Márquez, 36, grew up in La Toma, an isolated town nestled in western Colombia’s verdant Cuaca Mountains. Established in the early 1600s by escaped slaves, the Afro-Colombian community sits along the Ovejas River and residents depend on the river’s water and…
> Read more

Rewild Your Child. The Earth Depends On It.

Yes, we need to let our kids muck around in the mud, but we also need to somehow allow nature to seep inside them

This article originally appeared in JSTOR Daily. Imagine 20 million Americans taking to the streets, rallying in parks and congregating in theaters, schools and universities to protest our treatment of the planet. It’s hard now to picture this, but on April 22,…
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30 percent of Great Barrier Reef Coral Died in ‘Catastrophic’ 2016 Heatwave

Extent and severity of 'mass mortality' event documented in report has shocked scientists

Scientists have chronicled the “mass mortality” of corals on the Great Barrier Reef, in a new report that says 30 percent of the reef’s corals died in a catastrophic nine-month marine heatwave. Photo by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/Mia…
> Read more

Coming to the Rescue of the Endangered Philippine Eagle

Can captive breeding and community-based conservation save this great raptor?

The Philippine eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi), endemic to the Philippines and one of the world’s largest and heaviest eagles, continues to face the threat of extinction due to ignorance and deforestation. Photo courtesy of HCruz985/Flickr rOne of the world’s largest and heaviest eagles…
> Read more

Poland Violated Law by Logging UNESCO-protected Białowieża Forest, Court Rules

At least 10,000 trees are believed to have been felled in the ancient forest since 2016

The EU’s highest court has ruled that Poland’s logging in the UNESCO-protected Białowieża forest is illegal, potentially opening the door to multi-million euro fines. Photo courtesy of Greenpeace Poland Logs cut and ready for removal from Poland's Białowieża forest. The EU's highest…
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more articles

Voices

Gina Lopez
The Philippine’s former environment secretary talks about how love can be a force for change and her support of the country’s controversial president.
> Read more
Dineen O’Rourke
The 2017 Brower Youth Award winner writes about why we need to focus on climate justice.
> Read more

Current Issue

thumbnail of the cover of the Earth Island Journal

Storm

In the dry Patagonian desert, penguins are contending with an unexpected impact of climate change: rain.
By Eric Wagner

The Way of the Canoe

For many generations, canoes have allowed us to engage intimately with the environment.
By Mark Neužil

Where to Travel in 2018

By “voting with our wings” – choosing our destinations well and cultivating our roles as citizen diplomats – we can change the world for the better.
By Ethical Traveler

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